Categories
Memoir Nonfiction

The Seizure

A grand mal seizure reveals something more dire: anaplastic oligodendroglioma.

Categories
Memoir Nonfiction Writing

Polly Was a Fat Dog

The story of the world’s fattest liver and white basset hound

Categories
Memoir Nonfiction

El Chupacabra on a Friday night at 1 a.m.

We used to lay there, on our backs, on a tin roof the color of a sardine can, peeled back at the eave, black tar sealant spread like mustard on bread.

Categories
Memoir Nonfiction

This Is Me Being Uncomfortable: Episode 004

In this episode of “This Is Me Being Uncomfortable,” I mumble largely about writing, creativity, and the influence of life (and death) experience on how you see the world.

Categories
Nonfiction Memoir

Do You Not Know How Beautiful You Are?

Anorexia isn’t all about looks or beauty. There’s much more to it than that.

Categories
Memoir Nonfiction

This Great Big Scary Thing

I open the door of the car which swings open freely, and set my feet on the ground, run for the tree line. There is a path in here somewhere, the hayfield, I know it. There isn’t. I will have to create my own path. This is where the adventure starts. Where the snakes hide in wait. Where the flowers form at the root and the weeds do all they can to strangle the beauty. The road is not paved before me. It never was. This is where the children of my past run freely. Where the thorns snag at shirts and acorns fly through the air like bullets piercing into skin.

Categories
Memoir Nonfiction

The Last Leaf

The portly woman had her own path to be exact, worn white into the grass that led to her car. After this curiosity, I reached into my coat pocket and retrieved a folded copy of “The Last Leaf,” by O. Henry that I had printed prior to my departure from Charlottesville earlier in the day. “Don’t laugh at me,” I said to my then-girlfriend. “I’m going to read you a short story.”

Categories
Memoir Nonfiction

Thoughts From My Grandmother’s Funeral; or, This is Not Sad, Depressing Commentary

The year was 1997. I sat in the backseat of a tiny Toyota Corolla with my perfumed, slightly purpled hair Granny Hamlett as my neighbor. She was seated directly behind my dad at the wheel whose eyes searched for fellow road warriors and interstate truckers to shake his head at.