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Memoir Nonfiction

But whatever I am has its source back there…

But whatever I am has its source back there . . . from which I left . . . and to which I never returned to live.

“But whatever I am has its source back there . . . from which I left . . . and to which I never returned to live. I have always known, though, that part of me never left, could never leave, the place where I was born and, further, that what has been most significant in my life had all taken place.”

— Harry Crews
A Childhood: The Biography of a Place

By Jeffrey Pillow

Jeffrey Pillow is an American short story writer, memoirist, and poet. He is the author of The Lady Next Door. His writing has been published in Urge Magazine, The Nervous Breakdown, 16 Blocks, USA Today, Sports Illustrated, TheBody.com, New York Times, Washington Post, and Richmond Times-Dispatch.

He grew up in the small town of Phenix, Virginia, population: 200, and now lives in Charlottesville with his wife, two kids, and a dog named Mozzarella Cheese. He is a graduate of the University of Virginia where he was a Rainey Scholar. This is his blog.

One reply on “But whatever I am has its source back there…”

I like to say that my roots are in the desert but my branches are in the Pacific NW. I’ve been here, in Portland, for over 18 years. I moved here when I was 23. I’ve realistically been in Portland longer than I was ever in any one town all across the desert SW, yet somehow the desert remains my home.

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